PRESS

A warm welcome to the press section.

This page offers you an overview of all our services for journalists, editors and influencers. In addition to press releases, we provide background texts on the different thematic sections of the museum. They contain interesting insights and information about topics such as our digital museum concept, the many facets of gold, museum architecture, and children at the museum.

Upon request, we will gladly send you a selection of high-quality press photos by the famous architectural photographer Hubertus Hamm. Please write to presse@goldkammer.de with your contact data and tell us what you plan to use the photos for.

With your request, you accept our terms of use of the image rights. We explicitly point out that you agree to mention the following in the context of publication:

  • Hubertus Hamm. All rights by Goldkammer Frankfurt GmbH, Goldkammer.de

For the use of pictures by Marcus Ebener, please contact the photographer directly. The use of these images is only permitted after approval by Marcus Ebener himself and Goldkammer, with subsequent naming:

  • Marcus Ebener, all rights reserved. By courtesy of the Goldkammer Frankfurt GmbH.5

Please also send us a message if you would like to have further information or be placed on our mailing list.

The Goldkammer Frankfurt at a glance

The Goldkammer Frankfurt is one of the most modern museums in Europe. The spectacular museum building contains an underground system of treasure chambers with more than 500 objects spanning 6,000 years of cultural history. From Gold’s origins to its symbolic meaning in different cultures to its use as an article of exchange and currency, the Goldkammer Frankfurt allows visitors to discover the many facets of gold.

Especially for children, the museum offers a self-developed fairytale path that provides entertaining facts about selected objects. School classes and larger groups are invited to pay an exclusive visit to the museum before regular opening hours on weekdays. Admission is free for visitors under the age of eighteen. The Goldkammer Frankfurt is operated by Goldkammer Frankfurt GmbH as a subsidiary of Degussa Goldhandel GmbH.

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Press contact

Kai Baumgartner
Degussa Goldhandel GmbH
e-mail: presse@degussa-goldhandel.de

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Conditions for the use of image rights

If you, as our contractual partner, decide to use photographic material made available to you by us, the Goldkammer Frankfurt GmbH, Kettenhofweg 27, 60325 Frankfurt am Main (hereinafter referred to as “Goldkammer”), the following conditions apply.

  1. Based on your verbal, textual, or written request, you will receive from Goldkammer the authorization to use the photograph/presentation, the exact description of which we will provide you with when you send it to us, once only for the purposes confirmed in the letter of transmittal. Purposes that can be agreed upon between us:
    – the right to one-time reproduction;
    – the right to a one-time publication in your publication organ;
    – the right to a one-time publication in a catalog;
    – the right to publish on your homepage for a maximum of 1 year;
    – the right to use on-demand on your webpage/application for a maximum of 1 year;
    – the right to archive is always excluded;
    – the concrete purpose is to be indicated by you with the inquiry.
  2. The Gold Chamber transfers to you the right to one-time, non-transferable, and non-exclusive use, always limited to the agreed-upon concrete purpose.
  3. Rights to processing are expressly excluded.
  4. You are obliged to make the following mention in the context of publication: “Hubertus Hamm. All rights with Goldkammer Frankfurt GmbH”.
  5. You are obliged to send a specimen copy free of charge to the Goldkammer within 3 days after publication.
  6. In case of violation of the rights granted under clause 1 or the obligations under clause 2 and 3, you will pay a contractual penalty of EUR 1,000.00 in each case of violation. The claim for damages remains unaffected.
  7. The place of performance and jurisdiction is Frankfurt am Main.

774

Short: The Goldkammer Frankfurt at night

Long: The extensively renovated mansion that houses the Goldkammer Frankfurt is located at Kettenhofweg 27 in the heart of the Frankfurt’s Westend district. The building is listed as a historic monument.

778

Short: The gold bars of the Rothschild Collection come in a surprising variety of shapes and sizes.

Long: The more than 300 gold bars on display come from the largest collection in the world, commonly known as the Rothschild Collection. The Goldkammer presents part of this collection, which consists of 1,084 bars from 145 manufacturers in 35 countries.

776

Short: In a reconstructed mine shaft, visitors learn about the origins of gold, its occurrence in rock and water, and extraction methods.

Long: The first section of the exhibition presents many surprising and interesting facts about the origins, occurrence, and mining of gold. Highlights include meteorites from outer space that are around 4.6 billion years old, and a nearly four-kilogram gold nugget from Western Australia.

756

Short: Rammed earth is an archaic material like gold but provides a striking contrast to its great value.

Long: When designing the underground exhibition space, the architect chose natural stone, marble, bronze, and rammed earth as basic materials. The rammed earth walls naturally regulate interior humidity.

754

Short: In the center of this section, prestigious artifacts made by the Scythians, Thracians and Achaemenids present the art of goldsmithing among nomadic equestrian peoples in the first millennium BC.

Long: In the first millennium BC, the Scythians, Achaemenids and Thracians controlled the region around the Black Sea. They did not have their own writing system, but left behind art treasures with a rich symbolic language.

758

Short: This area of the museum is divided into three sections that recount the story of gold in early cultures.

Long: This area of the museum is divided into three sections that recount the story of gold in early cultures. The highlight is a hoard of Bronze Age artifacts made by a goldsmith who was a true master of his trade. Other select pieces made by early peoples show the significance of gold as a medium of magic and power.

760

Short: In antiquity, gold played a central role in the pursuit of prestige and luxury.

Long: In antiquity, gold was an economic factor and status symbol. The rich and powerful demonstrated their social position with prestigious gold objects. Gold busts embodied both imperial and divine power.

772

Short: In antiquity, courage and entrepreneurial spirit transformed gold from a coveted article of exchange into a minted coin.

Long: “Piece of Gold / Piece of Money” presents important milestones in a historical development that continues to define our world today. It traces the transformation of gold from a pre-monetary means of payment to a currency.

764

Short: In antiquity, the valuable coinage metal gained the power to influence world politics. Everyone who desired rank and esteem sought gold.

Long: In antiquity, gold was an economic factor and a status symbol. The rich and powerful demonstrated their social position with prestigious gold objects. Gold busts embodied both imperial and divine power.

762

Short: Constantine the Great ordered the destruction of all objects that recalled his vanquished opponent Licinius I. The only surviving gold bust of the ruler is all the more valuable.

Long: Execution and erasure of his name – this was the sentence that Constantine, the Western Roman emperor, handed down to Licinius, ruler of the Eastern Roman Empire, in 325 AD. As part of this abolitio nominis, almost all of the objects that recalled Licinius were destroyed. It is all the more surprising that this bust has survived.

766

Short: The daring attempts to find and recover the exhibited artifacts lend them an unforgettable air.

Long: Columbus put out to sea to find a maritime route to Asia. He discovered a new world full of treasures that he seized for Spain.

768

Short: For sixteen years, the treasure diver Mel Fisher searched for the sunken Atocha. When he finally found the wreck, he was rewarded with unimaginable riches.

Long: Hundreds of Spanish ships sank. Many became legendary as wrecks, including the treasure galleon Atocha and vessels from the 1715 fleet. Their precious cargo lay on the seabed for centuries before being salvaged.

770

Short: In a brilliant display incorporating glass and light, the treasures of famous shipwrecks appear to be under water.

Long: Some of the ships become legends as wrecks. Their dramatic sinking, the mystery of their lying hidden on the seafloor for centuries, the daring attempts to find and recover them – these factors lend the displayed artifacts an unforgettable air.

794

Short: Croesus stater – the first minted gold coin.

Long: Croesus, the king of Lydia, is said to have possessed unimaginable wealth. Although the gold production in his country filled his treasure houses, his reputation was based primarily on the coins he minted. No one in the world could conduct trade in the period without encountering his symbol – the bull and the lion.

792

Short: Phanes stater – first coin in the world with an inscription.

Long: The first coin in the world with an inscription comes from Ionia, an ancient territory in the western part of modern-day Turkey. Experts interpret the inscribed letters as reading “Phanos emi Seima” – “I am the badge of Phanes.” However, there is no record of a king of this name. Could it be a reference to a god? Or perhaps to a merchant, an official or a place?

790

Short: Double spiral bracelet – a skillfully forged masterpiece from alluvial gold.

Long: Like the circle and the wheel, the spiral was a symbol of the sun, which was a central element in Bronze Age religion. The spirals on this piece of jewelry are particularly beautiful. From the delicate center of the coils to the solid band forming the bracelet, the goldsmith crafted a timeless masterpiece that brings into harmony the powerful look of 250 grams of alluvial gold and the finely structured ornamentation.

786

Short: Scythian stag appliqué – a piece of jewelry with protective powers.

Long: The person who decorated his shield or quiver with this gold appliqué was thought to gain invincible strength and keen vision during the day and at night. According to the Scythian religion, people could acquire the powers of animals by depicting their features in gold. Through magic, what they desired took on tangible form

784

Short: Ring idol – the heaviest known specimen of its kind.

Long: Most ring idols weigh between two and five grams. Tipping the scales at 22 grams, this idol far surpasses all comparable objects. That it was cast is noteworthy. Special fuels such as charcoal and constant blasts of fresh air are needed to heat gold to its melting point.

780

Short: Stone meteorite – a rare “oriented” messenger from the birth of the solar system.

Long: Stone meteorites come from the crust of asteroids. They consist primarily of silicates, a mineral group that forms the upper layers of the Earth. Heavy metals such as gold and platinum sink into the asteroid’s interior and are found mainly in the fragments of its core.

782

Short: Crystalline gold – formed by the cooling of a hot solution.

Long: Crystalline gold originates in hot flowing liquids that rise from great depths to the Earth’s crust and contain dissolved gold. Together with the hot liquid, the gold seeps into cracks, pores and fissures in rock. It forms crystals when it cools.

796

Short: Croesus stater – the first minted gold coin.

Long: Croesus, the king of Lydia, is said to have possessed unimaginable wealth. Although the gold production in his country filled his treasure houses, his reputation was based primarily on the coins he minted. No one in the world could conduct trade in the period without encountering his symbol – the bull and the lion.

798

Short: Bust of Licinius I – the only surviving gold bust of the Eastern Roman emperor.

Long: Execution and erasure of his name – this was the sentence that Constantine, the Western Roman emperor, handed down to Licinius, ruler of the Eastern Roman Empire, in 325 AD. As part of this abolitio nominis, almost everything that recalled Licinius was destroyed. Gold objects were among the first things to be thrown into the smelting furnace. It is thus all the more surprising that this bust survived.

800

Short: Bust of Licinius I – the only surviving gold bust of the Eastern Roman emperor.

Long: Execution and erasure of his name – this was the sentence that Constantine, the Western Roman emperor, handed down to Licinius, ruler of the Eastern Roman Empire, in 325 AD. As part of this abolitio nominis, almost everything that recalled Licinius was destroyed. Gold objects were among the first things to be thrown into the smelting furnace. It is thus all the more surprising that this bust survived.

802

Short: Monkey from Peru – medicinal and intoxicating.

Long: In 1470, the Chimú people were conquered by the Incas. The confiscated treasures later fell into Spanish hands, and only a few of the once famous gold artifacts survived. They include this monkey, which was mounted on a ritual standard or a ceremonial headdress.

804

Short: Monkey from Peru – medicinal and intoxicating.

Long: In 1470, the Chimú people were conquered by the Incas. The confiscated treasures later fell into Spanish hands, and only a few of the once famous gold artifacts survived. They include this monkey, which was mounted on a ritual standard or a ceremonial headdress.

788

Short: Scythian griffin phiale – bowl for libations.

Long: According to the legend of the Scythians’ origins, when the sons of the first man walked the Earth, a golden bowl fell from the heavens and lent the youngest son priestly powers. Phiales were used primarily for libations – the ritual pouring of wine.